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Le marché du livre ancien ou épuisé

Galaxidion propose depuis plus de trois ans, un service complet aux libraires et aux bibliophiles. En continuité avec la tradition de la vente sur catalogue, vous êtes au c?ur de l'Internet bibliophile, sur un des premiers sites français, structuré, référencé et reconnu par sa qualité.


Henry Rowe Schoolcraft

Collection Summary Creator: Schoolcraft, Henry Rowe, 1793-1864 Title: Papers of Henry Rowe Schoolcraft 1788-1941 (bulk 1820-1856) Size: 25,000 items; 90 containers plus 1 oversize; 28 linear feet; 69 microfilm reels Repository: Manuscript Division, Library of Congress Abstract: Author, ethnologist, explorer, geologist, glass manufacturer, and Indian agent. Correspondence, journals, articles, books, manuscripts of magazines, poetry, speeches, government reports, Indian vocabularies, maps, drawings, and other papers reflecting Schoolcraft's career as a glass manufacturer, mineralogist on an exploring expedition in the Ozark Mountains, geologist on the Cass expedition to the Northwest Territory, leader of expeditions throughout the Great Lakes region, member of Michigan's legislative council, Indian agent, superintendent of Indian affairs for Michigan, ethnologist, and author of works concerning the Iroquois of New York state and other Indians of North America.


TennesseeBob's Famous French Links

TennesseeBob's Famous French Links rassemble depuis 1995 une vaste webliothèque des ressources francophones liées. Pour la plupart, les soixante-dix-neuf pages du site qui sont sur nos serveurs forment des carrefours de voies documentaires. Nos sites carrefour mènent à des millions de pages de textes littéraires, des centaines de cours et leçons complètes en langue française, des dictionnaires, et des milliards d'activités de grammaire. Je laisse aux autres le soin d'en faire de belles petites bibliothèques savantes et des sites à but unique.


The Aberdeen Bestiary

The Aberdeen Bestiary (Aberdeen University Library MS 24) is considered to be one of the best examples of its type. The manuscript, written and illuminated in England around 1200, is of added interest since it contains notes, sketches and other evidence of the way it was designed and executed.


Early Manuscripts at Oxford University

Early Manuscripts at Oxford University Digital facsimiles of complete manuscripts, scanned directly from the originals


Pendragon Press

"With over 250 titles in print, Pendragon Press is a leader in the publication of musicological research, reference works, and studies of many aspects of musical life. With 27 series, ranging from Aesthetics to the history of theory, to vocal music, we have been servicing the musicological community for over 30 years, and, with the help of our friends, hope to continue for another 30. "


19th Century Schoolbooks

19th Century Schoolbooks"The Nietz Old Textbook Collection is one of several well-known collections of 19th Century schoolbooks in the United States. Among the 16,000 volumes are many titles that are rarely held and have not yet been reproduced in microform collections or reprint editions. The collection is used by Pitt faculty and students as well as visiting scholars from other colleges and universities. The ULS received two U.S. Higher Education Act Title IIC grants (1985-1987) to catalog the original collection."


New Listings—Online Books Page

“This page lists the titles of on-line books that have recently been added to our index, or whose entries have been recently revised. For a full list of available books, try the main on-line books page.


Elizabeth Nesbit Room Chapbook Collection at the University of Pittsburgh

“The Elizabeth Nesbitt Room is located in the Information Sciences Library at the University of Pittsburgh and houses several special collections related to the history of children and their books and media. The volumes in this collection include more than 12,000 books and magazine titles of interest dating from the 1600's through today.”


Caxton‘s Chaucer at the British Library

“On this site you will find William Caxton’s two editions of Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, probably printed in 1476 and 1483. The originals are both in the British Library.”
Another interface at De Montfort University edited by Barbara Bordalejo, Canterbury Tales Project.
Other links to Chaucer.


An excellent report by Maureen Mulvihill of the auction of rare books and manuscripts from the estate of Paula Peyraud

The Paula Peyraud Collection: Samuel Johnson & Women Writers in Georgian Society. An Auction Report by Maureen E. Mulvihill as published in Eighteenth-Century Studies, Fall 2009, with 8 images and a list of selected buyers, prices & new locations of the Peyraud properties.
A pdf of the published report may be downloaded here: http://www.ilab.org/download.php?object=documentation&id=81
Bloomsbury Auctions: The Paul Peyraud Collection, Wednesday, 6 May 2009 Bookplate from Peyraud copy of Frances Burney’s <i>Cecilia</i>
‘DARK LADY’ OF RARE BOOK COLLECTORS, PAULA FENTRESS PEYRAUD (CHAPPAQUA, NY, 1947 ~ 2008). Peyraud Collection Auction, May 2009, Bloomsbury Auctions N.Y. 483 Lots (books, manuscripts, images). Sales total: $1.6 million, including premium. Photograph, Margie Van Dyke. Bookplate from Peyraud copy of Frances Burney’s Cecilia, (lot 218, buyer McGill University). Bookplate bears inscribed initials (“FCP - EKP”), being the collector’s grandparents Frank C. Peyraud & Elizabeth Krysler Peyraud, both visual artists (see “Peyraud,” Benezit, vol. 10, 2006 edition).


The Danish National Digital Sheet Music Archive

digital facsimiles of printed and manuscript music. Selected works from the Music Collections are being re-published in digital form in order to provide internet access to the collections of the Royal Library. Both manuscripts and printed music have been included: some are published expressly for printing, others are primarily intended for study. Most of the digitized scores can be seached and browsed in REX, while other materials are grouped in special databases and according to subjects. Questions about the digital music collection may be directed to:


Thumbprints of Ephelia

Thumbprints of Ephelia (Lady Mary Villiers): The End of an Enigma in Restoration Attribution. Text, Image, Sound. With a first ‘Key’ to ‘Female Poems . . . by Ephelia’ (1679). by Maureen E. Mulvihill (Princeton Research Forum, Princeton, N.J.); Hosted by ReSoundings (Millersville University, Pa.; 2001, with annual updates).

Mary Villiers, Duchess of Richmond

Lady Mary Villiers, when as Mary, Lady Stuart, Duchess of Richmond & Lennox, with her dwarf, Anne Shepherd Gibson. By Sir Anthony Van Dyck, Court Painter for Charles I. London, circa 1636. Mulvihill reads this famous gloves-and-dwarf portrait of Duchess Mary as ingeniously encoded text for the Duchess’s sly method of manuscript transmission.


SUMMER

THE SECOND PASTORAL, OR ALEXIS.

TO DR GARTH.

A shepherd’s boy (he seeks no better name)
Led forth his flocks along the silver Thame,
Where dancing sunbeams on the waters play’d,
And verdant alders form’d a quivering shade.
Soft as he mourn’d, the streams forgot to flow,
The flocks around a dumb compassion show:
The Naïads wept in every watery bower,
And Jove consented in a silent shower.

Accept, O Garth the Muse’s early lays, That adds this wreath of ivy to thy bays; Hear what from love unpractised hearts endure: From love, the sole disease thou canst not cure.
Ye shady beeches, and ye cooling streams, Defence from Phoebus’, not from Cupid’s beams, To you I mourn, nor to the deaf I sing, ‘The woods shall answer, and their echo ring.’ The hills and rocks attend my doleful lay; Why art thou prouder and more hard than they? The bleating sheep with my complaints agree, They parch’d with heat, and I inflamed by thee. The sultry Sirius burns the thirsty plains, While in thy heart eternal winter reigns.
Where stray ye, Muses, in what lawn or grove, While your Alexis pines in hopeless love? In those fair fields where sacred Isis glides, Or else where Cam his winding vales divides? As in the crystal spring I view my face, Fresh rising blushes paint the watery glass; But since those graces please thy eyes no more, I shun the fountains which I sought before. Once I was skill’d in every herb that grew, And every plant that drinks the morning dew; Ah, wretched shepherd, what avails thy art, To cure thy lambs, but not to heal thy heart! Let other swains attend the rural care, Feed fairer flocks, or richer fleeces shear: But nigh yon mountain let me tune my lays, Embrace my love, and bind my brows with bays. That flute is mine which Colin’s tuneful breath Inspired when living, and bequeath’d in death; He said, ‘Alexis, take this pipe—the same That taught the groves my Rosalinda’s name:’ But now the reeds shall hang on yonder tree, For ever silent, since despised by thee. Oh! were I made by some transforming power The captive bird that sings within thy bower! Then might my voice thy listening ears employ, And I those kisses he receives, enjoy.
And yet my numbers please the rural throng, Rough Satyrs dance, and Pan applauds the song: The Nymphs, forsaking every cave and spring, Their early fruit, and milk-white turtles bring; Each amorous nymph prefers her gifts in vain. On you their gifts are all bestow’d again. For you the swains the fairest flowers design, And in one garland all their beauties join; Accept the wreath which you deserve alone, In whom all beauties are comprised in one.
See what delights in sylvan scenes appear! Descending gods have found Elysium here. In woods bright Venus with Adonis stray’d, And chaste Diana haunts the forest shade. Come, lovely nymph, and bless the silent hours, When swains from shearing seek their nightly bowers, When weary reapers quit the sultry field, And crown’d with corn their thanks to Ceres yield; This harmless grove no lurking viper hides, But in my breast the serpent love abides. Here bees from blossoms sip the rosy dew, But your Alexis knows no sweets but you. Oh, deign to visit our forsaken seats, The mossy fountains, and the green retreats! Where’er you walk, cool gales shall fan the glade, Trees, where you sit, shall crowd into a shade: Where’er you tread, the blushing flowers shall rise, And all things flourish where you turn your eyes. Oh, how I long with you to pass my days, Invoke the Muses, and resound your praise! Your praise the birds shall chant in every grove, And winds shall waft it to the Powers above. But would you sing, and rival Orpheus’ strain, The wondering forests soon should dance again, The moving mountains hear the powerful call, And headlong streams hang listening in their fall!
But see, the shepherds shun the noonday heat, The lowing herds to murmuring brooks retreat, To closer shades the panting flocks remove; Ye gods! and is there no relief for love? But soon the sun with milder rays descends To the cool ocean, where his journey ends: On me Love’s fiercer flames for ever prey, By night he scorches, as he burns by day.
Alexander Pope [1688-1744]