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The American Language Reprint Series

The American Language Reprint (ALR) series aims to compile the various word-lists, vocabularies and phrase books which were collected in the early years of North American settlement. The series begins with the languages and dialects of the Eastern Woodlands, with a primary emphasis on the Eastern Algonquian and Iroquoian families. We hope to progressively extend the geographical scope of the project to form a comprehensive linguistic record of native North America prior to the advent of modern linguistics.


The Lucile Project

The Lucile project is an attempt to recover the publishing history of a single 19th century book. Owen Meredith's Lucile was first published in 1860, by Chapman & Hall in England and as a Ticknor & Fields "Blue & Gold" in the United States. It was reviewed in the New York Times, as well as other newspapers and magazines. In England, it saw only a handful of editions over the next 40 years. In the United States, however, it remained in print until 1938, last offered as a surviving title in Burt's Home Library remaindered to Blue Ribbon Books in 1936. It went out of print in 1938.


Zamora 80

In 1945 the Zamorano Club published The Zamorano 80: A Selection of Distinguished California Books Made by Members of the Zamorano Club. The criterion for inclusion was that a selection above all should be distinguished, and that rarity and importance would be secondary. Yet, over time, it appears that the eighty books selected are both distinguished and important, and a number of them are definitely rare. The Club's goal was to choose those books considered cornerstones of a serious collection of Californiana. The books listed in The Zamorano 80 for the most part have withstood the test of time.


Société Internationale de l'étude de Jeanne d'Arc

The International Joan of Arc Society / Société Internationale de l'étude de Jeanne d'Arc is a WWW repository of scholarly and pedagogic information about Joan of Arc collected by faculty, independent scholars, and students. 


The Center for Book Arts

The Center for Book Arts, a not-for-profit organization founded in 1974, offers over 100 classes and workshops in bookbinding, letterpress printing, paper marbling, typography, and related fields. The Center has mounted over 140 exhibitions during the last 25 years.


Pendragon Press

"With over 250 titles in print, Pendragon Press is a leader in the publication of musicological research, reference works, and studies of many aspects of musical life. With 27 series, ranging from Aesthetics to the history of theory, to vocal music, we have been servicing the musicological community for over 30 years, and, with the help of our friends, hope to continue for another 30. "


19th Century Schoolbooks

19th Century Schoolbooks"The Nietz Old Textbook Collection is one of several well-known collections of 19th Century schoolbooks in the United States. Among the 16,000 volumes are many titles that are rarely held and have not yet been reproduced in microform collections or reprint editions. The collection is used by Pitt faculty and students as well as visiting scholars from other colleges and universities. The ULS received two U.S. Higher Education Act Title IIC grants (1985-1987) to catalog the original collection."


Bobcat

"NYU Bobst Library, NYU Institute of Fine Arts, NYU Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, NYU Real Estate Institute, The New-York Historical Society, New York School of Interior Design, Cooper Union, New School University, Parsons School of Design, Mannes College of Music."


New York Public Library

The New York Public Library has been an essential provider of free books, information, ideas, and education for all New Yorkers for more than 100 years. Founded in 1895, NYPL is the nation’s largest public library system, featuring a unique combination of 88 neighborhood branches and four scholarly research centers, bringing together an extraordinary richness of resources and opportunities available to all.


The Rowley Poems by Thomas Chatterton

“Most people know the legend of Thomas Chatterton -- brilliant poet who failed to make a living, starved himself to send expensive presents to his family, and died by his own hand at seventeen -- much better than his poems. Like all legends, it is partial and exaggerated, but was a powerful influence on the Romantic movement and long after. The painting "The Death of Chatterton" by Henry Wallis epitomises this reputation. His fame rests, apart from this almost unbearably romantic life story, on his "Rowley Poems". These he wrote in a sham Middle English dialect, and passed off as the work of Thomas Rowley, a priest of Bristol in the fifteenth century, and some of his friends. The imposture was quickly detected (though some continued to believe in him for many years), but they were published in a collected edition after his death and were popular and much admired by the Romantic poets, especially Wordsworth, Shelley, and Keats, who dedicated "Endymion" to the memory of Thomas Chatterton.”


Renascence Editions

An Online Repository of Works Printed in English Between the Years 1477 and 1799.
“Renascence Editions is an effort to make available online works printed in English between the years 1477 (when Caxton began printing) and 1799. These texts have been produced with care and attention, but are not represented by the publisher as scholarly editions in the peer-reviewed sense. They are made available to the public for nonprofit purposes only. The publisher and general editor is Richard Bear at the University of Oregon. If you would like to edit a text in this series, send email to the Publisher.”


An excellent report by Maureen Mulvihill of the auction of rare books and manuscripts from the estate of Paula Peyraud

The Paula Peyraud Collection: Samuel Johnson & Women Writers in Georgian Society. An Auction Report by Maureen E. Mulvihill as published in Eighteenth-Century Studies, Fall 2009, with 8 images and a list of selected buyers, prices & new locations of the Peyraud properties.
A pdf of the published report may be downloaded here: http://www.ilab.org/download.php?object=documentation&id=81
Bloomsbury Auctions: The Paul Peyraud Collection, Wednesday, 6 May 2009 Bookplate from Peyraud copy of Frances Burney’s <i>Cecilia</i>
‘DARK LADY’ OF RARE BOOK COLLECTORS, PAULA FENTRESS PEYRAUD (CHAPPAQUA, NY, 1947 ~ 2008). Peyraud Collection Auction, May 2009, Bloomsbury Auctions N.Y. 483 Lots (books, manuscripts, images). Sales total: $1.6 million, including premium. Photograph, Margie Van Dyke. Bookplate from Peyraud copy of Frances Burney’s Cecilia, (lot 218, buyer McGill University). Bookplate bears inscribed initials (“FCP - EKP”), being the collector’s grandparents Frank C. Peyraud & Elizabeth Krysler Peyraud, both visual artists (see “Peyraud,” Benezit, vol. 10, 2006 edition).


THE VOICES OF SPRING.
SESTINA.

Why is it that the voices of the spring, 
The bluebird’s note, the redbreast’s mellow call, 
The sweet, sweet carols which the sparrows sing, 
The peeping of the frogs at evening’s fall, 
These vague regrets and homesick longings bring 
To hearts which listen for and love them all? 

All hearts rejoice when winter goes—and all 
Are glad to welcome back the tardy spring; 
To hear the woods responding to the call 
Which, rough and blustering, the March winds sing,—
To mark the shower’s blossom-waking fall, 
And the slight changes which the slow days bring. 

And yet, the first soft days are sure to bring 
A tender sadness with their joy, to all—
For with the new growth, buried memories spring 
As once of old at dread enchantment’s call, 
The dead arose and spake; how can we sing 
Or smile, when tears well up, and fain would fall? 

Even the lark’s voice has a mournful fall—
His lovely golden breast, that seems to bring 
The sunshine with it, and the warmth, and all 
That makes and glorifies the gracious spring, 
Is burdened with that long despairing call 
For one he seeks in vain,—how can he sing? 

We think of strains which hope was wont to sing 
In youth’s sweet Eden-land, before the fall 
Did to our souls time’s bitter wisdom bring 
And hush the angel-voices one and all; 
Yet we remember them, and every spring 
Catch far and faint the echo of their call. 

Never does summer-time or autumn call 
The same soft sadness back; the birds may sing, 
Flowers fade, and ripe October’s foliage fall, 
Yet not the same strange melancholy bring; 
It is the saddest season of them all, 
The weeping, haunted, unforgetful spring! 

Ah, lovely spring! though mating bluebirds call, 
And redbreasts sing, and sparrows song-showers fall, 
Thy soft hours bring the same sweet pain to all!
Elizabeth Akers Allen [1832-1911]